The Group Photo.2017 | Maria Kapajeva at Gallery of Photography Ireland

The Group Photo.2017 | Maria Kapajeva at Gallery of Photography Ireland

When

12/05/2020 - 30/06/2020    

Where

Online
Online, n/a, n/a

Event Type

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Gallery of Photography Ireland is delighted to premiere a new video by Maria Kapajeva, The Group Photo.2017, especially commissioned for the online presentation of her project Dream is Wonderful, Yet Unclear. The video centres on the making of a group portrait of the former mill employees in front of the factory’s main gates, once a meaningful place in their lives. Altogether 160 former workers between the ages of 40 and 90 came. Everyone who posed received a copy of the image. It is a meditation on the themes that underlie the project as a whole, considering how communities and historical memory intersect, presented as an online exclusive for Gallery of Photography Ireland, supported by A Woman’s Work, a Creative Europe Cooperation Project.

This video looks at the making of a group portrait of the former mill employees in front of the main gates of the mill, once a meaningful place in their lives. Altogether 160 former workers between the ages of 40 and 90 came. Everyone who posed received a copy of the image. This new video piece is an extended meditation on the themes that underlie the project as a whole, considering how community and historical memory intersect. It is presented as an online exclusive for Gallery of Photography Ireland, available to view on our website and social media channels.

Using a multidisciplinary approach, including archival materials alongside her own images and installations, Maria Kapajeva’s Dream is Wonderful, Yet Unclear considers the history of the community surrounding a textile mill in Narva, Estonia, now closed, where members of the artist’s family once worked. Kapajeva spent her childhood at the mill, drawing patterns and dreaming about becoming a fabric designer like her mother.

The story of this one small community is set in the larger context of post-industrial cities worldwide as the loss of their former roles leave them seeking new identities. Drawing on aspects of her mother’s work, her own unrealised childhood dreams and the failed ambition of industrial collectivization, Kapajeva underlines the complex relationship between personal and public memory that together form our historical narratives.

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